Building a strong culture within a team has become an important advantage for business leaders who strive for increased business success. You want to create a culture that identifies and embraces shared values, perspectives and ways of thinking that characterise the goals of a business.

Building an environment with like-minded and interesting people does not happen overnight — like most things, it requires hard work to nurture a more entrepreneurial culture.

Here are 5 ways to create a culture of entrepreneurs within your business.

1. Bring aspiring entrepreneurs on board

Ideally, every employer wants an employee who’s a motivated entrepreneur. However, employees often spend too much time looking for people to fill positions within their business, rather than seeking and sieving out assets that will help grow the organisation.

Aspiring entrepreneurs are likely to be attracted to a new business environment, eager to gain experience and see opportunities in the market where others do not. Founder and CEO of Porch.com, Matt Ehrlichman says that you need to bring these people in, and empower them to flex their entrepreneurial muscles within your business.

2. Accept small failures

Establishing an environment in which employees understand that small failures can happen in the pursuit of bigger success will go a long way. This will support them in taking risks, ultimately allowing a new business the opportunity to grow faster and smarter.

It’s often tough to accept that making mistakes is OK, but if you prove to your aspiring entrepreneurs that it is, they will take risks and potentially find a better way of doing things.

3. Your company is their company

Give employees in your company equity, and motivate them to feel like partners — viewing your company as their company. The best business leaders will make every employee feel like a business partner. Why? Because when your employees feel ownership, they look out for it, protect it, and pour themselves into it.

4. Give your employees a voice

Ask your employees for their recommendations — they will more than likely present information. You need to ask them questions like “What do you think?” and “How do you think we can improve this?”

By asking questions such as these, you’ll craft a business culture of thinking beyond contemporary procedures. Founder of Growthworks Solutions, Leah Neaderthal believes that asking employees for their recommendation is the first step towards creating entrepreneurs.

5. Allow your employees to take ownership

According to Avery Augustine, manager of a tech company, you need to coach people into leadership day after day — but your employees won’t actually use these skills unless they feel like a trusted, valued, and impactful part of the company.

“If you teach your employees how to make smart, informed decisions, but still require that they run every idea by you before they’re allowed to make a move, how empowered will they feel?”

Creating an ownership mentality begins with trusting your employees and giving them the authority to make decisions. This can also involve listening and implementing their ideas or allowing them to work on side projects that they believe will increase sales.

When your employees feel like an integral part of the company, they’ll naturally step up to the plate and emerge as leaders.

Sources:

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/247644

http://thevoiceofjobseekers.com/5-reasons-why-employers-should-hire-entrepreneurs/

https://www.safaribooksonline.com/library/view/the-complete-new/9780071744478/ch47.html

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/244309

http://www.business.com/starting-a-business/12-ways-foster-entrepreneurial-culture/

https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-strategies-that-will-turn-your-employees-into-leaders

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